10 Natural and Most Beautiful Island in Australia

Australia is the sixth-largest country by land area. Australia is bordered to the west by the Indian Ocean, and to the east by the South Pacific Ocean. The Tasman Sea lies to the southeast, separating it from New Zealand, while the Coral Sea lies to the northeast. Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Indonesia are Australia’s northern neighbours, separated from Australia by the Arafura Sea and the Timor Sea.

1. Heard Island and McDonald Islands

Uninhabited islands over 4000km from the Australian mainland.

Heard Island and McDonald Islands are uninhabited, barren, sub-Antarctic islands in the Southern Ocean, far due south of India and roughly 200 miles southeast of Kerguelen of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands. The islands are administered by Australia.

Heard Island is largely ice-covered, bleak and mountainous and is dominated by a large massif (Big Ben) and by an active volcano (Mawson Peak). The McDonald Islands are small, rocky and actively volcanic. The islands are populated by large numbers of seal and bird species, and have been designated a nature reserve. There are 4 types of penguins that are located on Heard Island

2. Coral Sea Islands

Largely uninhabited, with no developed traveller facilities.

The Coral Sea Islands are off the northeast coast of Australia, outside of the Great Barrier Reef.

Scattered over some 1 million square kilometers of ocean, the Coral Sea Islands were declared a territory of Australia in 1969. They are uninhabited except for a small meteorological staff on Willis Island. Automated weather stations, beacons, and a lighthouse occupy many other islands and reefs. These tropical sand and coral reefs and islands are an important nesting area for birds and turtles.

3. Kangaroo Island

The third largest island in Australia and a paradise for nature and wildlife lovers.

Kangaroo Island or KI is an island about 45 minutes by ferry off the coast of South Australia. The island is 145 kilometers east to west, and has an abundance of wildlife, natural scenery, wineries and beaches.

Kangaroo Island was separated from the mainland around 10,000 years ago. It was first explored by Matthew Flinders in 1802 whilst en route from UK to Sydney. He named the island in honour of the feast of Kangaroo he and his crew enjoyed on the island. More extensive mapping (especially of the south coast) was done by the French explorer Nicolas Baudin which is why a number of geographical features have French names.

4. Norfolk Island

Direct flights from the East Coast, and from Auckland. Permanent population, and developed facilities.

Norfolk Island is an island in the South Pacific Ocean and an Australian territory for historical reasons even though it is much closer to New Zealand.

Norfolk Island was a penal colony for the British colony of New South Wales during the periods 1788–1814 and 1825–1855. In 1856 it was settled by former inhabitants of the second largest of the Pitcairn Islands. The Pitcairn Islanders were descendants of Fletcher Christian and Bounty mutineers, together with Tahitian women. Pitcairn Island was unable to support 200 inhabitants, and Queen Victoria offered them land grants equivalent to a third of the then available land on Norfolk Island.

5. Lord Howe Island

Two hours flying time from Sydney, with a permanent population, and developed facilities. (Part of New South Wales), Lord Howe Island was listed as a World Heritage Site in 1982 due to its beauty and biodiversity.

Lord Howe Island is a tiny Australian island in the Tasman Sea east of Port Macquarie. It’s characterised by sandy beaches, subtropical forests and clear waters. In the south, a trail winds up soaring Mount Gower, with sweeping views. Ned’s Beach in the north has calm fish- and coral-rich waters. The island is home to seabird colonies, including masked boobies. Dive sites surround the nearby Admiralty Islands.

Lord Howe Island is crescent-shaped, approximately 11 km (6.84 miles) long and 3 km (1.86 miles) wide at its greatest width. The island forms the top of an extinct underwater volcano and seamount, projecting above the surface of the ocean. It has the southern-most coral reef in the world.

6. Macquarie Island

An Australian Antarctic base, halfway to Antarctica. No facilities for travellers.

Macquarie Island or Macca as it is affectionately known, is a Sub-Antarctic island in the Southern Ocean. The island is administered by Australia.

Macquarie Island is home to a large variety of wildlife, including thousands of seals and millions of penguins, and has been designated a World Heritage site. It is a Tasmanian State Reserve and is managed by the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service. It is Australia’s Sub-Antarctic jewel.

Macquarie Island is about 1500km SSE of Tasmania (Australia) and around 1200km N of Antarctica. The Australian Antarctic Division research station is located at the north end of the island. The island is 5km wide at its widest point and 34km long. The island’s total area is about 128 square km.

7. Torres Strait Islands

Direct flights from the East Coast, and from Auckland. Permanent population, and developed facilities.

Norfolk Island is an island in the South Pacific Ocean and an Australian territory for historical reasons even though it is much closer to New Zealand.

Norfolk Island was a penal colony for the British colony of New South Wales during the periods 1788–1814 and 1825–1855. In 1856 it was settled by former inhabitants of the second largest of the Pitcairn Islands. The Pitcairn Islanders were descendants of Fletcher Christian and Bounty mutineers, together with Tahitian women. Pitcairn Island was unable to support 200 inhabitants, and Queen Victoria offered them land grants equivalent to a third of the then available land on Norfolk Island.

8. Cocos (Keeling) Islands

Coral atolls, populated, accessible by flights from Perth, with some facilities for travel.

The Territory of Cocos (Keeling) Islands (or simply Cocos Islands or Keeling Islands) is in the middle of the Indian Ocean some 2750km north-west of Perth, and 900km west south-west of Christmas Island.

Cocos Island a nationally protected jungle-covered island and national park, 300m off the coast of Costa Rica. please see Cocos Island National Park. There are 27 coral islands in the group. Captain William Keeling discovered the islands in 1609, but they remained uninhabited until the 19th century. Annexed by the UK in 1857, they were transferred to the Australian Government in 1955.

9. Christmas Island

Famous for its red crab migration. Flights from Perth and Kuala Lumpur, developing facilities.

Christmas Island is one of the islands of the Indian Ocean, south of Indonesia and some distance northwest of Australia, of which it is a territory. Christmas Island rises to a central plateau of stands of rainforest. Its 80km coastline is an almost continuous sea cliff up to 20 metres high, with a few shallow bays of small sand and coral shingle beaches. The largest of these forms the island’s only port, Flying Fish Cove.

Named in 1643 for the day of its discovery, the island was annexed and settlement was begun by the UK in 1888. Phosphate mining began in the 1890s. The UK transferred sovereignty to Australia in 1958. Almost two-thirds of the island has been declared a national park.

10. Ashmore and Cartier Islands

Uninhabited with no developed traveller facilities.

Ashmore and Cartier Islands are a territory off the northwest coast of Australia.

These uninhabited islands came under Australian authority in 1931; formal administration began two years later. Ashmore Reef supports a rich and diverse avian and marine habitat; in 1983 it became a National Nature Reserve. Cartier Island, a former bombing range, is now a marine reserve.