10 Most Beautiful Places To Visit In Norway

Norway is on a large peninsula shared with Sweden in the north of Europe. In the north, it also borders Finland and Russia.

Norway is well known for its amazing and varied scenery. The fjords in the west of the country are long narrow inlets, flanked on either side by tall mountains where the sea penetrates far inland. By far the major part of the land is a rocky wilderness, and thus Norway has large, completely unpopulated areas, many of which have been converted to national parks. Even outside the national parks, much of the land is unspoiled nature.

A rugged landscape shaped by the Ice Age, shows forested hills and valleys, mountains, waterfalls, and a long coastline with fjords, islands, and mountains growing directly up from the sea. Norway’s highest point is Galdhøpiggen, 2,469m (8,100 ft) in the Jotunheimenregion that lies midway between Oslo and Trondheim, but away from the coast. In the far north (Finnmark), you will find flatter open spaces. Several of the world’s greatest waterfalls are in Norway, particularly in the western fjords and the mountain region.

1. Oslo

Oslo, the capital of Norway, sits on the country’s southern coast at the head of the Oslofjord. It’s known for its green spaces and museums. Many of these are on the Bygdøy Peninsula, including the waterside Norwegian Maritime Museum and the Viking Ship Museum, with Viking ships from the 9th century. The Holmenkollbakken is a ski-jumping hill with panoramic views of the fjord. It also has a ski museum.

2. Alesund

Alesund is built on a row of islands extending towards the Atlantic. The compact old city centre is thus surrounded by water and Alesund is a major fisheries harbour.

The old city centre of Alesund was destroyed by fire in the first years of the 20th century. Much international aid, including personal gifts from Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany who used to holiday there, helped to rebuild in the most modern style, Art Nouveau.

From the city there is a beautiful view of the Sunnmore Alps in the East.

3.Bergen

Bergen is the second largest city in Norway and the most popular gateway to the fjords of West Norway. The city is renowned for its beautiful nature and offers excellent hiking opportunities in its immediate surroundings. Having fostered many of Norway’s greatest bands and artists, the city is also famous for its cultural life and underground/indie music scene

Once the capital of Norway, old Hanseatic trading centre with a rich culture and dramatic scenery, Norway’s second largest city. Wonderfully cute wooden buildings, a magnificent mountain setting and tons of nightlife and atmosphere. This is your gateway to the western fjords. The city has been dubbed “the rainiest city in Europe” with an average of 250 days of rainfall a year. Bring an umbrella.

4.Bodø

Bodø is the largest city and administrative centre of Nordland county in Norway. Its population is above 45 000 people, which makes it the second largest city in Northern Norway, after Tromsø.

The gateway to the magnificent Lofoten islands and Saltstraumen, the worlds strongest maelstrom

5.Kristiansand

Kristiansand is the capital of Vest-Agder County, Norway. By population, it is the fifth largest city of Norway. The city is sometimes called Kristiansand S, where S stands for South, to distinguish it from Kristiansund in western Norway.

Kristiansand – The jolly capital of the South, Kristiansand is located on Norway’s southern coast and has long been a favourite summer holidays spot amongst Norwegians. The sea and surrounding fjords are perfect for recreational activities like fishing and sailing. Kristiansand is the business and cultural capital of Southern Norway. Nicknamed “the coolest riviera” by the media, it is a modern city with a cosmopolitan history.

6. Stavanger

Stavanger is the fourth largest city of Norway with a population of 126 021 within city proper as of January 1, 2011. It is in the south-western coast of the country. The urban area of Stavanger stretches across many neighboring municipalities, making it the third largest city in Norway by total urban population with 197 852 inhabitants as of January 1, 2011.

Commercially important due to the oil business. The wooden, cobbled central area is one of the most charming places in Norway. Home to one of Norway’s medieval churches, you can also visit Iron Age homes, stone age caves, and sites where the Viking kings used to meet at Ullandhaugtårnet. Stavanger is where Erik the Red was born.

7. Tromsø

Tromsø (Romsa in Northern Sámi and Tromssa in Kvensk/Finnish; is a city in the very northernmost part of Norway. It is almost 350 km north of the Arctic Circle and is one of the best places to view the spectacular Northern Lights in winter.

Tromsø is a surprise to most visitors: Here you find art, history, sophistication, good food and an infamous nightlife in a bustling, tiny city. All of it, though, is surrounded by spectacular scenery that is visible from everywhere in town. The city is home to the world’s northernmost university, as well as research institutes and satellite based industry. The population is therefore highly skilled, but retains the straightforwardness and sense of humour that the North is known for.

8. Trondheim

Trondheim is an old city in central Norway. The city is dominated by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology; its more than 25,000 students are a lot in a city with merely 184,000 inhabitants in total, and this contributes greatly to the city’s economy.

Trondheim is the oldest of Norway’s major cities, and its old heritage can still be traced in and around the city centre. The marvellous Nidaros Cathedral, the second largest church of Northern Europe, towers over the city centre, which is roughly the area inside the meandering Nidelva.

The city boasts a rich, cultural heritage, but is still a major centre. Even if the size is modest, there’s a lot going on in Trondheim. Music, arts, culture, alternative politics, nightlife, student life… all combines into making Trondheim one of the most exciting city centres of Northern Europe.

9. Møre og Romsdal

Møre og Romsdal is in West Norway. It is the most northerly of the famous west coast fjord regions and its northern location possibly cuts visitors – but it yields to none of the others in its scenery.

Møre og Romsdal county includes deep fjords, alpine mountains, gentle valleys, countless green islands, wide forests, the wild Atlantic coast, impressive mountain roads, numerous lakes, barren mountain plateaus, charming mountain farms, and the highest waterfalls in Norway. This region is rich in natural resources such as fisheries, natural gas and hydro electric power. The highest mountains and waterfalls are in the district around Geiranger, Valldal, Tafjord, Åndalsnes, Eikesdalen valley and Sunndal valley. Along the coast and to the North (in the Nordmøre area closer to Trondheim), the mountains are lower, less steep and the forests wide and deep. Due to the deep fjords and numerous islands all parts of this region has easy access to the Atlantic and transport depends on ferries.

10. Jostedalsbreen

Jostedalsbreen is in Sogn og Fjordane of Norway. Jostedalsbreen is the largest glacier on the European mainland.The glacier and the mountains surrounding it became a national park in 1991.Mountains, some of them bare-scrubed by the ice. Many valleys. And glaciers rising to a height of 2083 m (6833 ft).

At lower elevation the flora is quite rich. This is because of the pure meltwater flowing down the valley. Closer to the glacier the flora is of an artic type. On the glacier there is not much animal life. Red deer, lynx and wolverines could be spotted. In the mountains and valleys around the fauna is richer. Expecially the red deer could often be seen. Eagles could also be seen.